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Rural-urban differences in the prevalence and predictors of depression among adolescents in South Africa

C K Ajaero, C T Nzeadibe, E E Igboeli

Abstract


Background. Mental health is part of overall health, but there is dearth of research on the rural–urban differences of depression among adolescents in South Africa (SA). 

Objectives. To present an analysis of rural–urban differences in the prevalence of depression and to assess the sociodemographic predictors of depression among adolescents in SA. 

Methods. Data were obtained from the National Income Dynamics Study (NIDS), wave 4 of 2014, which was conducted on a nationally representative sample of 3 751 respondents (15 - 19 years). Univariate analysis was used to describe the study population while bivariate analysis was used to test for significant differences in the depression status of the population. Finally, binary logistic regression was used to estimate the predictors of depression. 

Results. Urban adolescents (14.64%) were more depressed than their rural counterparts (9.40%). Gender, income levels and province of residence also showed significant differences in both rural and urban areas. The significant predictors of depression in both rural and urban areas were race, age, income and province of residence. 

Conclusion. Counselling and rehabilitation programmes should be targeted more at urban, more educated and higher-earning adolescents, especially in provinces with a relatively higher prevalence of depression.


Authors' affiliations

C K Ajaero, Department of Geography, Faculty of the Social Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria;Demography and Population Studies, Faculties of Health Sciences and Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

C T Nzeadibe, Department of Geography, Faculty of the Social Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

E E Igboeli, Department of Geography, Faculty of the Social Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

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Cite this article

South African Journal of Child Health 2018;12(2b):71-74. DOI:10.7196/SAJCH.2018.v12i2b.1509

Article History

Date submitted: 2018-09-04
Date published: 2018-09-04

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