Review

Children with oculocutaneous albinism in Africa: Characteristics, challenges and medical care

J R Kromberg, P Manga, R Kerr

Abstract


Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is an inherited condition characterised by significantly reduced pigment in skin, hair and eyes, visual defects and an increased risk of skin cancer. In the South African black population, 1 in 4 000 people is affected. Quality of life in children with albinism is influenced not only by health problems, but also by stigmatisation, rejection and cultural issues. This review aims to explore the latest literature available on the epidemiology, genetics, clinical characteristics, psychosocial issues and possible management strategies, focusing on affected children. The knowledge provided here is required of health professionals if a more fully informed service is to be offered to these children and their families.


Authors' affiliations

J R Kromberg, Division of Human Genetics, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand and National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa

P Manga, Division of Human Genetics, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand and National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa Ronald O Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, USA

R Kerr, Ronald O Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, USA

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Cite this article

South African Journal of Child Health 2020;14(1):50-54.

Article History

Date submitted: 2020-04-23
Date published: 2020-04-23

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