Research

Kangaroo mother care: Lived experiences of mothers in three hospitals of Limpopo Province, South Africa

N D Ndou, T M Mulaudzi, R A Anokwuru, A H Mavhandu-Mudzusi

Abstract


Background. Kangaroo mother care (KMC) is a low-expense, highly effective management plan for preterm babies in low-to middleincome countries. Limpopo Province initiated KMC as part of the Limpopo Initiative for New-born Care in their district hospitals. We explored the experiences of mothers during KMC in the hospitals in Vhembe District.

Objective. To document lived-in experiences of mothers providing KMC in Vhembe District of Limpopo Province, South Africa. Methods. Using a phenomenological design, 13 mothers who provided KMC were interviewed from the three hospitals in the Vhembe District. Following a phenomenological analysis of each transcript, three main themes emerged. All relevant ethical protocols were observed during the research.

Results. The mothers’ experience was characterised by three main themes and nine sub-themes. The mothers understood the practice, rationale and benefits of KMC. Despite this knowledge, mothers reported challenges: strained family relationships, fatigue associated with the practice of KMC, inadequate hospital amenities, and ineffective instrumental support and disruption of academic progress for the student mothers. Mothers received emotional support from their relatives, spouses and professional nurses.

Conclusion. This is the first known study to report on the shortage of amenities regarding KMC. It is important for the Limpopo Department of Health to improve the provision of basic amenities in the unit to sustain the objectives of the Limpopo Initiative for New-born Care.


Authors' affiliations

N D Ndou, Department of Advanced Nursing Sciences, University of Venda, Thohoyandou, Limpopo, South Africa

T M Mulaudzi, Department of Advanced Nursing Sciences, University of Venda, Thohoyandou, Limpopo, South Africa

R A Anokwuru, Department of Advanced Nursing Sciences, University of Venda, Thohoyandou, Limpopo, South Africa

A H Mavhandu-Mudzusi, Department of Health Studies, University of South Africa, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa

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Cite this article

South African Journal of Child Health 2021;15(2):99-102. DOI:10.7196/SAJCH.2021.v15i2.01766

Article History

Date submitted: 2021-07-21
Date published: 2021-07-21

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